Flood Gallery Fine Art Center

Flood Mission

Flood Fine Art Center is a non-profit contemporary art institution dedicated to advancing the careers of emerging and mid career artists, as well as educating the public and furthering the understanding of contemporary art and its importance within the community and beyond. We aim to provide a stimulating environment for artists so that they will successively enlighten, challenge, inspire, and elevate awareness for the necessity of art in contemporary culture.

Flood Fine Art Center seeks to be a vital cultural resource for Asheville through providing funding and space for innovative local and national artists as well as curators who stretch boundaries in all media. Through our extensive exhibition schedule, residency program, educational activities, presentations and publications we aim to serve a diverse audience that will in turn enhance quality of life and provide opportunities and experiences that would otherwise be unavailable.

Utility Trances September 1st 2007

Alicia Henry, Lain York, Ben Roosevelt, Rob Smith, Greg Pond

Utility Trances is an exhibition about physical and psychic processes of
engagement and estrangement through which our suspension of disbelief is
simultaneously called and undone. The effect of the exhibition is to
dislodge expected associations of image, material and space without
relying upon artifice or other fancy tricks. The exhibition involves four
artists, Alicia Henry, Ben Roosevelt, Lain York, Rob Smith and Greg Pond,
working in a variety of media from sound to installation to drawing.

Lain York presents a series of paintings on wood panels collectively
called Family Grouping. York initiates his paintings as representations of
primitive masks and artifacts that he views as evidence of attempts at
discovery to which he contributes by further "shifting around the
intangible." The result is a record that relocates mystery to a new
artifact that "it is the record by which we tell each other that we are
alive." York has been a central figure in the Nashville art community for
many years. As a curator, gallery manager, and arts advocate he has
fostered the proliferation of contemporary art. His own work is in many
important collections including The Savannah College of Art and Design,
Tennessee State Museum, The Metropolitan Nashville Arts Commission,
Trans-Financial Bank, Nashville, TN, EMI, Los Angeles.
http://r.vresp.com/?bolmstudios/a477ebfc6b/835835/e0d6d25fe9/583d2d0

Alicia Henry makes sculptures within which issues of isolation and
individuality mix with reflections on familial and social interaction.
"Isolation and interaction is a common recurring idea in my work. I am
interested in the complexities and the contradictions surrounding familial
relationships as well as societal differences and how these variations
affect individual and group responses to themes of Beauty, the Body, and
Identity. My current work explores these ideas, addressing the process
through which groups (specifically female) navigate these issues." Alicia
Henry holds a BFA degree from The School of Art Institute of Chicago, an
MFA degree from Yale University, and another post graduate degree from the
Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture. She has also spent a tour of
duty with the Peace Corps in Ghana. Alicia has received grants from the
Guggenheim and Ford Foundations and a residency in Hydra Greece. Her work
has been shown in the Whitney Museum of Art, The Carnegie Museum in
Pittsburgh, The Frist Museum in Nashville and the Drawing Center in New
York.

Alicia Henry is currently a professor of art at Nashville's Fisk University.

Ben Roosevelt received his MFA from the Burren College
of Art last year and holds a Master's in Theology from Vanderbilt
University. His work engages topics such as waiting rooms, social
statistics, and the spatial dynamics of buildings and cities, probing the
visual codes and existential confusion produced by the modern built
environment. Since 2005, his work has been involved in several exhibitions
in Ireland, including a recent solo show at Ard Bia Gallery in Galway and
contributions to the Vending Machine Project in the Dublin Fringe
Festival, 2006. Ben's work is currently featured in the Atlanta Biennial
and House Projects in Ireland. Roosevelt and curatorial collaborator, Emma
Houlihan, recently received a grant from the Irish Arts Council to put on
a large exhibition in Galway in 2007. Ben currently lives in Atlanta where
he has been selected for the Studio Artist Program at the Atlanta
Contemporary Art Center and received the Forward Arts Foundation Emerging
Artist Award for 2007-2008.

Rob Smith is a interdisciplinary artist, not to mention a former band mate
of Ben Roosevelt. Smith describes his variable practice as thus: "at this
point, ink and sound serve the same purposes for me, however they hold sway in different courts. Both are punctuations in silence, both rearrange the spaces they disrupt... My current work tries to challenge our social and physical syntax, betraying most of our trustworthy signifiers as empty." His work has recently been in exhibitions in Portland, OR, Austin, and Nashville, and his geologic design work is currently published in the Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. In addition to his gallery-based work, Smith has an adventurous career as a drummer, collaborating with many of Nashville's most progressive and experimental musicians including Taiwan Death, Scottie Gilbert, Dave Maddox, Chris Davis, and Keenan Lawler. His performance with Derek Shartung and Angela Messina made in James Turrell's Blue Pesher at the Cheekwood Museum of Art has been distributed as a limited release CD. Rob Smith was chosen by the Milan-based gallery Montrasio Arte to take part
in their Harlem Studio Fellowship in NY for the summer. While in New York
he has been sitting in with jazz musicians in Harlem, and collaborating
and performing with NY based painter and musician Warren Holt. Smith's work will soon be featured in exhibitions in Milan, Italy and New York, and he will begin an MFA program in new media at the University of Oregon this Fall.

Greg Pond makes sculptures out of speaker wire, rabbit skins and old
t-shirts, electronic sounds, and videos shot on the small farm where he
lives. He draws comparisons between his small island of farmland awash the
rising tide of suburbia to utopian projects of the past. He and Lain York
were founding members of Fugitive Projects in Nashville and have exhibited
together several times over the last 8+ years. Pond is currently a James
Kennedy III fellow at the University of the South where he teaches
sculpture and video. He curated an international exhibition of utopian
video art for the Cheekwood Museum in Nashville and has just returned from
conducting sound installations in castles and large warehouses while on
residency programs in western Ireland and Zurich. Recent and upcoming
exhibitions of his own work include venues in Ireland, Basel, Switzerland,
Memphis, Portland, Oregon, Athens, Georgia, Austin, Texas, Nashville, and
the Oxford Film Festival.